EU road death figures: third year of poor results

Valletta – The European Commission has published new data showing that deaths on EU roads fell by just 2% last year, following a 1% increase in 2015.

According to ETSC analysis, road deaths will now need to fall by 11.5% a year in order to meet the EU target of cutting deaths by half in the decade to 2020.

Commenting on the publication of the latest figures, Antonio Avenoso, Executive Director of the European Transport Safety Council said:

“With around 500 deaths on EU roads every week, a figure that has hardly budged in three years, bold action from the EU and member states is long overdue.

“EU minimum vehicle safety standards have not been updated since 2009. A plan to require carmakers to install life-saving technologies such as automated emergency braking, overridable intelligent speed assistance and passenger seat belt reminders in all cars was postponed last month until March 2018, and even then will face several years before the changes are implemented.  Every day of delay will mean more avoidable deaths.

“Member states also need to reprioritise action on enforcement, infrastructure safety improvements and measures to make pedestrians and cyclists safer on our roads. Road deaths and serious injuries devastate lives and cost the European economy billions every year.”

Road deaths per million inhabitants

Preliminary country by country statistics for 2016[1]

2010 2015 2016 20152016[2] 20102016
Belgium 77 65 56 -13% -24%
Bulgaria 105 98 99 0% -9%
Czech Republic 77 70 59 -16% -23%
Denmark 46 31 37 18% -18%
Germany 45 43 39 -7% -12%
Estonia 59 51 54 6% -10%
Ireland 47 36 40 13% -11%
Greece 112 73 75 2% -35%
Spain 53 36 37 2% -31%
France 64 54 54 0% -13%
Croatia 99 82 73 -12% -28%
Italy[3] 70 56 54 -5% -21%
Cyprus 73 67 54 * -23%
Latvia 103 95 80 -16% -28%
Lithuania 95 83 65 -22% -37%
Luxembourg 64 64 52 * -6%
Hungary 74 65 62 -6% -18%
Malta 36 26 51 * 69%
Netherlands[4] 32 31 33 4% 3%
Austria 66 56 49 -11% -23%
Poland 102 77 79 2% -23%
Portugal 80 57 54 -10% -40%
Romania 117 95 97 1% -19%
Slovenia 67 58 63 8% -6%
Slovakia 65 57 50 -12% -22%
Finland 51 49 45 -6% -8%
Sweden 28 27 27 2% -1%
United Kingdom[4] 30 28 28 1% -4%
EU 63 51.5 50 -2% -19%

 

[1] The 2016 figures are based on provisional data; there might be minor changes in the final data for individual countries.

[2] Percentage change in the number of fatalities

[3] Estimation based on data from January to June

[4] Estimation based on data from January to September

* Statistically not significant